Lawrence G. Townsend Intellectual Property Lawyer
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Trademark Law Archives

News and Notes Focused on the 3 Public Faces of IP Law

  • Brand Image Protection - Trademark Law
  • Visual Image Protection - Copyright Law
  • Personal Image Protection - Right of Publicity Law

The Image Protection Law blog has been created in order to share stories and information on the legal aspects of: 1) the marketplace reputation of a company or product captured in its trademark, 2) published or publicly-displayed artwork, photography, and any created visual design, and 3) use of a person's photograph or likeness for product promotion or other commercial purposes.

The "IP3" share at least one thing in common: Image is everything. In these posts let's look at what that means in the realm of intellectual property in the news, but let's also be prepared to explore if there's something more beyond "everything." Don't forget, the intellectual in "intellectual property" doesn't mean smart or brainy, although by nature true creators often are. The word is used to refer to any creation, i.e., a "product of the mind." While this blog will be regularly updated, you are encouraged to share your thoughts on these posts.

Color alone may in certain circumstances be trademarked

At our law firm, we help people protect their trade and service marks for brands, slogans, logos and similar ways to uniquely identify the source of a particular product, good or service in the marketplace. We also represent people being accused of infringing or diluting another party's mark. 

Part 1: Judge finds counterfeiting of Harley-Davidson trademarks

The San Francisco law firm of Lawrence G. Townsend, Intellectual Property Lawyer, represents a range of clients in trademark matters — ranging from protecting distinctive marks or symbols, to preventing wrongful use of trademarks, to asserting trademark infringement claims or defending against them in court. 

Discussing the Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy

Domain names are basically street addresses for the web. They are critical pieces of information that hold a ton of value, not just as a part of a company's intellectual property portfolio, but also from the more practical perspective of branding your company and your website.

Reviewing common questions with trademarks

Trademarks are a crucial part of the world of intellectual property, but not every person, inventor, writer, or company knows what to do to obtain a trademark or how to appropriately utilize a trademark. With that in mind, we would like to answer some frequently asked questions about trademarks in today's post.

Court says colorful language not a bar to trademark registration

A couple of federal court decisions - one of them from the highest court in the land - may well be prompting some to wonder where the line is now when it comes to what can and cannot be federally registered as a trademark.

How can I best protect my brand in the Chinese market?

San Francisco creatives, whether they are artists or forward-thinking business people, know globalization is not a passing fancy. Money-making opportunities abound in markets other than the United States, but taking advantage of them requires extreme due diligence to protect your interests. Without proper care, something could get lost in translation, literally, with harsh financial consequences.

Beer trademark dispute takes iconic twist

Last week, our post was about a cross-border trademark fight between a nearly monolithic beer brewer and one that has no presence beyond a small town in one U.S. state. This week, we take another plunge into the brewing world without the tongue-in-cheek tone of the last. That's because of the iconic nature of the mark in question - Route 66.

Getting serious about funny beer trademarks

There's something about craft beer that seems to encourage unusual names. Who would drink a Pabst or Budweiser when there are such products available as Buttface Amber Ale? Or "I'll have what the gentleman on the floor is having - Polygamy Porter." From Palo Alto, we have Hoppy Ending Pale Ale.

Comic convention lawsuit: 'Genericide' in action?

In our last post, we explored the issue of "genericide." As we discussed, the genericization of a product or a brand is something that attentive business people want to avoid. The risk is that if a trademark isn't defended and the product or service it's associated with becomes commoditized, it can erode the ability to optimize earnings.

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